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It was the reason that, one day in June 2015, Alexandra Elbakyan, the student and programmer with a futurist streak and a love for neuroscience blogs, opened her email to a message from the world’s largest publisher: “YOU HAVE BEEN SUED.” It wasn’t long before an administrator at Library Genesis, another pirate repository named in the lawsuit, emailed her about the announcement.“I remember when the administrator at Lib Gen sent me this news and said something like ‘Well, that’s...I wrote this to help you cut through the avalanche of marketing and technical babble and we are only going to focus on the essentials. Enter in the name of the new Email Account and type the new password in twice. Once your spirit can soar on its own, then you are ready to “allow” him the privilege of ur time. I’ve been proposed to 3 times; asked by 4 boyfriends to have their child. Getting your business online for the first time can be confusing and frustrating sometimes. Taking a little longer than I expected to choose the recipients of the tuition/student loan/books money.

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“It’s basically ‘That’s an ass.’ But it doesn’t translate perfectly into English. We’re fucked.’” The publisher Elsevier owns over 2,500 journals covering every conceivable facet of scientific inquiry to its name, and it wasn’t happy about either of the sites. She had more pressing matters to attend to, like filing assignments for her religious studies program; writing acerbic blog-style posts on the Russian clone of Facebook, called v Kontakte; participating in various feminist groups online; and attempting to launch a sciencey-print T-shirt business.

They had also taken to battling advocates of Open Access, a movement that advocates for free, universal access to research papers.

Sci-Hub provided press, academics, activists, and even publishers with an excuse to talk about who owns academic research online.

As a student doing research at the Russian Academy of Sciences, she ran across an obstacle encountered by students the world over: paywalls. But as ’s records showed that a year’s subscription to a chemistry journal in the US ran, on average, for ,773; the cheapest subscriptions were to general science journals, which only cost

“It’s basically ‘That’s an ass.’ But it doesn’t translate perfectly into English. We’re fucked.’” The publisher Elsevier owns over 2,500 journals covering every conceivable facet of scientific inquiry to its name, and it wasn’t happy about either of the sites. She had more pressing matters to attend to, like filing assignments for her religious studies program; writing acerbic blog-style posts on the Russian clone of Facebook, called v Kontakte; participating in various feminist groups online; and attempting to launch a sciencey-print T-shirt business.

They had also taken to battling advocates of Open Access, a movement that advocates for free, universal access to research papers.

Sci-Hub provided press, academics, activists, and even publishers with an excuse to talk about who owns academic research online.

As a student doing research at the Russian Academy of Sciences, she ran across an obstacle encountered by students the world over: paywalls. But as ’s records showed that a year’s subscription to a chemistry journal in the US ran, on average, for $4,773; the cheapest subscriptions were to general science journals, which only cost $1,556 per year.

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“It’s basically ‘That’s an ass.’ But it doesn’t translate perfectly into English. We’re fucked.’” The publisher Elsevier owns over 2,500 journals covering every conceivable facet of scientific inquiry to its name, and it wasn’t happy about either of the sites. She had more pressing matters to attend to, like filing assignments for her religious studies program; writing acerbic blog-style posts on the Russian clone of Facebook, called v Kontakte; participating in various feminist groups online; and attempting to launch a sciencey-print T-shirt business.They had also taken to battling advocates of Open Access, a movement that advocates for free, universal access to research papers.Sci-Hub provided press, academics, activists, and even publishers with an excuse to talk about who owns academic research online.As a student doing research at the Russian Academy of Sciences, she ran across an obstacle encountered by students the world over: paywalls. But as ’s records showed that a year’s subscription to a chemistry journal in the US ran, on average, for $4,773; the cheapest subscriptions were to general science journals, which only cost $1,556 per year.

,556 per year.

Most science journals charge money to access their articles. Those prices make these journals inaccessible to most people without institutional access — and they’re increasingly difficult for institutions to finance as well.

Over half of all research, according to one study, is now published by the big five of academic publishing: Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and, depending on the metric, either the American Chemical Society or Sage Publishing.